The haunted palace essay

If the circumstances surrounding John Aronhalt’s death were shocking, what happened after he died was even more so. In the March 14th edition of the Star , just three days after John Aronhalt died, the headline “Nettie Aronhalt Dead!” appeared on the front page. Nettie, of course, was the daughter who was at home with John Aronhalt when the fire broke out, and she died after ingesting a self-administered poison. Most significantly, the same Star article mentions that she, “died without making a confession.” Of course, the obvious implication is that she had something to confess.

Dear Sean, I have no idea whether the house in question is really haunted. I’ve never been in it. The facts of the case – Wayne Thomas murdered his wife and step-son – are well documented in the Marion Star and other newspapers from that time. Wayne Thomas was your dad, wasn’t he? I’m very sorry things turned out the way they did for everyone, including you and the rest of your family he left behind. You’re right – it’s a terribly sad story. And I would be lying if I said having this story on this website didn’t make me a little uncomfortable. But at least here in Marion, the house is well-known as the site of those murders, and of course such a dramatic event has led to a lot of stories floating around town. The Criswell/Holycross family lived in that house from 2008 to 2010, and they say the house was haunted. They were very believable and had nothing to gain by telling me about their experiences in the house. And while I do make money from the book sales, believe me, I’m not going to retire to the Bahamas any time soon. More than anything, I published the story because it’s part of the fabric of Marion. And while it’s not a happy story, that doesn’t mean it’s not worth saving. If you’d like to share the Wayne Thomas you knew and what led him to such a sad end, please feel free to write to me. I’d be happy to publish what you have to say.

But it is The Banjo Lesson that has become the iconic painting of his entire career. Its economy of scale, its emotional delicacy, its nuanced orchestration of light and shadow and symbolism situates it in a resonant space in American art history. Both The Banjo Lesson and The Thankful Poor were remarkable achievements for Tanner—works that according to the art historian Judith Wilson, “invest their ordinary, underprivileged, Black subjects with a degree of dignity and self-possession that seems extraordinary for the times in which they were painted.”[2] It is a testament to Tanner’s vision as an artist, and his personal convictions as an African-American, amid the possibilities offered by twentieth century, that these two paintings continue to speak so profoundly to us now.

The intelligence recovered on one target in, say, Mosul, might allow for another target to be found, fixed upon, and finished in Baghdad, or even Afghanistan. Sometimes, finding just one initial target could lead to remarkable results: The network sometimes completed this cycle three times in a single night in locations hundreds of miles apart — all from the results of the first operation. As our operations in Iraq and Afghanistan intensified, the number of operations conducted each day increased tenfold, and both our precision and success rate also rose dramatically.

The haunted palace essay

the haunted palace essay

The intelligence recovered on one target in, say, Mosul, might allow for another target to be found, fixed upon, and finished in Baghdad, or even Afghanistan. Sometimes, finding just one initial target could lead to remarkable results: The network sometimes completed this cycle three times in a single night in locations hundreds of miles apart — all from the results of the first operation. As our operations in Iraq and Afghanistan intensified, the number of operations conducted each day increased tenfold, and both our precision and success rate also rose dramatically.

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