Quotations from books in essays


About This Site


 


Sunday, Oct. 01, 2017 Reference Desk Acronyms Almanacs Answers Associations Ask an Expert Biographies Business Calculators Calendars Countries Current Events Dictionaries Encyclopedias Genealogy Government Grammar/Style Historic Docs How To Images Legal Lists Maps Medical Music People Public Records Q&A Quotations States Statistics Style Guides Thesauri Time Trivia White Pages Yellow Pages Zip Codes Library News Book Reviews Education Headlines Library News Library Journals -------------- HEADLINESPOT Today's Top Stories Search the News News By City News By State News by Country Arts & Entertainment Education News Health News Political News Sports News Weather Much More... StartSpot Network Search LibrarySpot or Google |   Great Must-See sites   |   Read Articles and Lists | Find answers | Did you know?  

Regarding the clerk, the use of quotes depends on whether those are the exact words the clerk uses with people or whether that’s the gist of what the clerk says. You may use your discretion as the author.
If the exact words:
The clerk sighed. “That’s why I always tell people, ‘You should never put a bag down without keeping an eye on it, especially in this place.’ ”
If not the exact words:
The clerk sighed. “That’s why I always tell people you should never put a bag down without keeping an eye on it, especially in this place.”

In this passage, Montag muses on the sun as he escapes the city and floats down the river in “Burning Bright.” Montag sees the stars for the first time in years, and he finally enjoys the leisure to think that Faber told him he would need in order to regain his life. He starts by considering the moon, which gets its light from the sun, then considers that the sun is akin to time and burns with its own fire. If the sun burns time (and, thus, burns away the years and the people) and he and the firemen continue to burn, everything will burn. These thoughts lead him to the conclusion that since the sun will not stop burning, he and the firemen must stop. In these lines, Bradbury repeats the word “burning” to communicate the sense of revelation that Montag experiences as he considers this and to subtly suggest that the ex-fireman must now redefine his ingrained conceptions of fire and burning, and, therefore, his identity and purpose.

Quotations from books in essays

quotations from books in essays

Media:

quotations from books in essaysquotations from books in essaysquotations from books in essaysquotations from books in essays