My ambition essay

The “Copper Canyon” Adventure Park is located in the near the railway station of Chihuahua to the Pacific known as “El Divisadero”. Besides the natural beauty of the area and the ancient culture of Tarahumaras that inhabit the region, now has one of the most impressive mountain parks in the world.
This has a set of 7 zip lines and two suspension bridges to add nearly 5 kilometers, comprising a via ferrata, repel, rock climbing and a small suspension bridge accessed via a Tarzan jump, a restaurant with spectacular terraces and glass floor, ancient walking trails, mountain bike rentals, camping sites, horseback riding and finally, the third longest cable car in the world, with 3 miles of cable without intermediate towers.

Other critics interpret this passage in a more positive manner. It can be read as Jane’s affirmation of the equality between her and Rochester, as testimony that she has not “given up” anything. The passage is followed in the novel by a report on St. John Rivers. Jane writes: “his is the spirit of the warrior Greatheart . . his is the ambition of the high master-spirit. .” (Greatheart serves as guide to the pilgrims in Bunyan’s Pilgrim’s Progress. ) Emphasizing St. John’s desires for “mastery” and his “warrior” characteristics, Jane describes a controlling patriarch. While Rochester may have been such a figure at the beginning of the novel, his character has changed by its conclusion. He has lost his house, his hand, and his eyesight to a fire, and the revelation of his youthful debaucheries has shown him to be Jane’s moral inferior. Rochester can no longer presume to be Jane’s “master” in any sense. Moreover, Jane has come to Rochester this second time in economic independence and by free choice; at Moor House she found a network of love and support, and she does not depend solely on Rochester for emotional nurturance. Optimistic critics point to Jane’s description of St. John as her reminder that the marriage she rejected would have offered her a much more stifling life. By entering into marriage, Jane does enter into a sort of “bond”; yet in many ways this “bond” is the “escape” that she has sought all along. Perhaps Brontë meant Jane’s closing words to celebrate her attainment of freedom; it is also possible that Brontë meant us to bemoan the tragic paradox of Jane’s situation.

My ambition essay

my ambition essay

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