Faith & reason essays in the philosophy of religion

There is much that “modern science has yet to explain.” I am not convinced that those gaps in our knowledge are “ever-narrowing.” It seems to me that the more we learn the more we realize how much we don’t know. Scientific discoveries often create huge new mysteries. It is just as irrational to assume, with a “naturalism of the gaps” attitude, that eventually a natural explanation for all such mysteries will be found, as it is with a “God of the gaps” approach to always react to a mystery with, “That must be the part God does.”

Some lines of this hymn came to my mind this morning as I was looking to a fresh start for the new year. A review of what Ebenezer meant brought me to this site. I have a stone sitting on my shelf at work – I am going to call it my Ebenezer Stone and look to it often in this new year. It will be a reminder of the Lord who helps me, especially when I am prone to wander from moment-to-moment dependence on Him. I can get so easily overwhelmed with the daily demands and unfinished tasks and try so hard to catch up in my own strength… At the start of this New Year, 2013, I raise my Ebenezer!! Thank you.

If surpluses are used in charity, or in cooperatives for human purposes such as home-building for the less affluent, life necessarily becomes simpler and the ideal of voluntary poverty cannot be far behind. The Christian doctrine of property becomes a reality, namely the retaining of a sufficiency of goods for an adequate life and the sharing of the remainder with the needy. In point of fact, millions of Christians, working for wages, actually live out this teaching on property. How else do we explain the world-wide network of the works of mercy supported by the small gifts of the many, Though there are Catholic millionaires, the masses of Catholics are rather the victims than the beneficiaries of corporations as they roam about the world seeking profits.

T he sticky ‘problem’ of the persistence of religion is a favourite discussion topic on rationalist websites. Adhering to a view of history as a teleological climb by humanity to greater and greater heights of rationality, they see religion as an irrational vestige of a more primitive mankind. Just as those striving for transhuman immortality pity the ‘deathists’ – those caught up in a romanticised view of human finitude – the rationalists pity the ‘goddists’ and the ‘religionists’. Religion’s promise of heaven or another afterlife, they say, is a comfort that maintains humanity’s deathism and prevents it from working towards a better world in the here and now.

Faith & reason essays in the philosophy of religion

faith & reason essays in the philosophy of religion

T he sticky ‘problem’ of the persistence of religion is a favourite discussion topic on rationalist websites. Adhering to a view of history as a teleological climb by humanity to greater and greater heights of rationality, they see religion as an irrational vestige of a more primitive mankind. Just as those striving for transhuman immortality pity the ‘deathists’ – those caught up in a romanticised view of human finitude – the rationalists pity the ‘goddists’ and the ‘religionists’. Religion’s promise of heaven or another afterlife, they say, is a comfort that maintains humanity’s deathism and prevents it from working towards a better world in the here and now.

Media:

faith & reason essays in the philosophy of religionfaith & reason essays in the philosophy of religionfaith & reason essays in the philosophy of religionfaith & reason essays in the philosophy of religion