Comparative literature dissertation proposal

The Graduate Program in Comparative Literature is an internationally recognized site for advanced study in comparative literature. Students are trained to pursue interdisciplinary and multilingual work grounded in the reading of texts in the original languages. Faculty work in areas including gender and feminist studies, postcolonial theory, media and cultural studies, critical theory, science and science fiction studies, and comparative ancient civilizations. Students have flexibility in designing their own unique interdisciplinary and interliterary programs. Among the literatures students may work in are Arabic, Chinese, Classical Greek, English, Filipino, French, German, Italian, Indonesian, Korean, Japanese, Latin, Malaysian, Russian, Spanish, and Vietnamese.

The Rutgers Program in Comparative Literature is pleased to announce a five-year collaboration with the Autonomous National University of Mexico (UNAM) . This partnership, beginning in 2018-19 and funded generously by the Mellon Foundation’s Critical Theory in the Global South initiative, will support reciprocal dissertation workshops in Mexico City and New Brunswick, as well as the creation of a new interdisciplinary course, to be taught concurrently in English and Spanish at Rutgers and UNAM, on “The University and Its Publics: North, South, and In Between.”

Fields: 19th- and 20th-century literature; politics of culture; feminism; Marx, Derrida; globalization.  Books: Myself Must I Remake: The Life and Poetry of W. B. Yeats (1974), Of Grammatology (translation with critical introduction of Jacques Derrida, De la grammatologie, 1976), In Other Worlds: Essays in Cultural Politics (1987; Routledge Classic 2002), Selected Subaltern Studies (ed., 1988), The Post-Colonial Critic: Interviews, Strategies, Dialogues (1990), Thinking Academic Freedom in Gendered Post-Coloniality (1993; 2d ed forthcoming), Outside in the Teaching Machine (1993; Routledge classic 2003), Imaginary Maps (translation with critical introduction of three stories by Mahasweta Devi, 1994), The Spivak Reader (1995), Breast Stories (translation with critical introduction of three stories by Mahasweta Devi, 1997), Old Women (translation with critical introduction of two stories by Mahasweta Devi, 1999), Imperatives to Re-Imagine the Planet / Imperative zur Neuerfindung des Planeten (ed. Willi Goetschel, 1999; 2d ed. forthcoming), A Critique of Postcolonial Reason: Towards a History of the Vanishing Present (1999), Song for Kali: A Cycle (translation with introduction of Ramproshad Sen, 2000), Chotti Munda and His Arrow (translation with critical introduction of a novel by Mahasweta Devi, 2002), Death of a Discipline (2003), Other Asias (2005), An Aesthetic Education in the Age of Globalization (2012), Readings (2014), Du Bois and the General Strike (forthcoming).  Significant articles: "Subaltern Studies: Deconstructing Historiography" (1985), "Three Women's Texts and a Critique of Imperialism" (1985), "Can the Subaltern Speak?" (1988), "The Politics of Translation" (1992), "Moving Devi" (1999), "Righting Wrongs" (2003), "Ethics and Politics in Tagore, Coetzee, and Certain Scenes of Teaching" (2004), "Translating into English" (2005), "Rethinking Comparativism" (2010), "A Borderless World" (2011), "General Strike" (2012),  "Crimes of Identity" (2014), "Our World" (2014).  Activist in rural education and feminist and ecological social movements since 1986.

Comparative literature dissertation proposal

comparative literature dissertation proposal

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